Forthcoming Events at Brooklands – Jan to Mar 2016

four classics

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands

Below are events taking place at Brooklands Museum during the next three months. Further details can be best found at the Brooklands Trust Members (BTM) website. See www.brooklandsmembers.co.uk/events and choose BTM, Talk or Museum events or phone 01932 857381.

JANUARY

Ist        New Year’s Day Gathering.  Pre-1986 classics, supercars and interesting vehicles on site.  Fasttrack entry for BTM classic cars via VickersBridge. Parking in The Heights*’

17th      BTM Talk –  ‘Engineering with a Brush’ – the Art of Richard Wheatland. Display of stunning automotive and aviation paintings with roast lunch.

19th      BTM Talk –  ‘The Greenwood Family and Brooklands’ by Alan Greenwood.

21st      40th anniversary of the first scheduled Concorde flights. Details from ext237 or email: flyconcorde @brooklandsmuseum.com

30th      Vintage Motoring Film Evening and Supper. Booking via Ann Watson, ext 243 or email: annwatson@ brooklandsmuseum.com

31st      VSCC Driving Tests. Test Hill in action and auto tests on Museum site. Parking in The Heights”.

FEBRUARY

14th     BTM Talk  - ‘In conversation with Captain Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown and Jaguar driver Norman Dewis -living on the Edge’.

 14th      Concorde Champagne Day.  Details from ext 237 or email: flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com

15th-19th         Half-term family activities, including Car Rides.

16th      BTM Talk –  Sir John Egan ‘The man who saved Jaguar’.

18th      BTM coach trip to Morgan, Malvern.  Limited to 40 places. Members £50, non-members £55. Contact Angela Hume on 07884-184882

21st      Winter Classic Breakfast. Gates open from 7.45am. Test Hill in action.

28th      BTM  - New Year Family Talk with CBBC TV science presenter Fran Scott.

 MARCH

5th        Concorde Champagne Day. Celebrating the anniversary of Concorde’s maiden flight in 1969. Detail from flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com  or ext 237.

6th        Mach 2 for Tea’. Champagne on Concorde and afternoon tea. Details from flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com or ext 237.

6th        Austin Morris Day. Cavalcade on Mercedes-Benz World circuit, Test Hill in action and mass photo on Members’ Banking. Parking in The Heights’.

12th      Histories auction. Parking in The Heights’

17th      BTM Talk –  Zoe Cano  ‘The Girl on a Motorcycle”

20th      Bentley Drivers Club.  Driving Tests.  Test Hill in action and auto tests.  Parking in The Heights

29th-31st   Easter school holiday family activities including Car Rides 

These listings are kindly provided by Brooklands Museum

Weybridge Police Team Newsletter – Nov 2015

 

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From: Andrew Kim (PC 3729)
Safer Neighbourhood Team
Elmbridge Borough
SURREY POLICE

Report dated 3 December 2015

Dear Weybridge Residents, Businesses, NHW and Councillors

I am now back on fully operational duties.  I have not fully recovered from Bells Palsy yet but it is getting better everyday. Hopefully you will see me out in Weybridge soon.

We have experienced multiple Burglary offences in November – 11 Residential Burglaries which is too many.

  • Dwelling Burglary

o   Oatlands Drive – detached property suspect has entered rear  garden via side gate, opened insecure rear door to conservatory and forced locked internal door into lounge all bedrooms untidy search
o   Bridge Road – an attempt to force entry to property via a casement window
o   Finnart Close -  low value items stolen from residential flat.
o   Grenside Road -  have approached front door and attempted to enter property by tampering or drilling the lock
o   Glencoe Road – entry has been gained to property vehicle taken from front of house.
o   Balfour Road – person unknown attempted to fiddle with lock to gain access to a property
o   St Albans Avenue – Suspects have entered property during the night while occupants are asleep upstairs and have removed electrical items.
o   Thames Street – entered by lifting up insecure lower portion of rear ground floor window. Attempted Theft of Pedal cycle
o   Dorchester Road – FOUND MONEY MISSING FROM A PURSE ON THE KITCHEN TABLE.
o   Wey Road – entered property by unknown access point, tidy search and taken am amount of money
o   South Road -  gained entry to large 5 bedroom house and gone to master bathroom and removed diamond bracelet

  • Non-Dwelling

o   The Crescent – 2 mountain bikes stolen from insecure shed located at bottom of garden
o   Portmore Park Road – BICYCLE STOLEN FROM LOCKED SHED IN REARGARDEN.
o   Admiral Close – Have broken into standalone shed within residential grounds and stolen golf clubs and a bike
o   the Mount – SHED HAS BEEN ENTERED AND PUSH BIKE STOLEN
o   NetherbyPark – GARAGE BROKEN INTO OVERNIGHT AND TWO BIKES STOLEN

There are a lot of information available on Home security – Metropolitan Police has a good section introducing Home security.

http://content.met.police.uk/Site/crimepreventionbumblebee

There is also a PDF file associated with this message which will be published separately on the SGHI website.

PLEASE LOOK AFTER YOUR NEIGHBOURS – IF THEY ARE VULNERABLE AND NEED HELP, PLEASE LET US KNOW BY DIALING 101 or EMAIL US ON elmbridge@surrey.pnn.police.uk

We are carrying out increased patrols under Operation Candlelight and this will continue for some time.

Please report anything / anyone suspicious by dialling 101 (to pass information) or 999 (in progress or where immediate Police attendance is required)

———————————————-

OPERATION SIGNATURE – FRAUD PREVENTION

Surrey and Sussex Police are running Operation Signature:

Please visit http://www.sussex.police.uk/help-centre/ask-us/fraud,-scams-and-financial-issues/what-is-operation-signature

What kinds of scams are there?
Common fraud types are:
- Mail scams: con artists use fake lotteries and prize draws, get-rich-quick schemes, bogus health cures and pyramid selling to get money from their victims
- Investment scams: the victim is offered investment opportunities in land, fine wines, share sales or carbon credits which have little or no value
- Romance scams: the scammer meets someone on a dating site and gains their trust. They tell their victim they need money for a family emergency or flights over to see them
- Courier scams: fraudsters call and trick the victim into handing cards and PIN numbers to a courier on their doorstep
- Fraud recovery scam: when fraudsters approach the victim again under a different guise, such as Trading Standards or Court officials, demanding money up front in order to finance court action to recoup some of the losses from the original crime.

There are many more types of fraud. Please see the Action Fraud website for more details.
Key things to remember:
- Never send or give money to anyone you don’t know or trust
- Check people are who they say they are
- Don’t share your personal information
- Make decisions in your own time
- If in doubt phone a relative or a friend
Trust no-one who cold calls you about your bank account or a problem with your computer. Under no circumstances would the bank or police request a card PIN or security details over the telephone or arrange collection of bank cards from a home address.

PLEASE LOOK AFTER YOUR NEIGHBOURS – IF THEY ARE VULNERABLE AND NEED HELP, PLEASE LET US KNOW BY DIALING 101 or EMAIL US ON elmbridge@surrey.pnn.police.uk

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PROTECTING YOUR BUSINESS

When a business is burgled, stock, valuables and trading time are lost. Commercial burglary can cripple a company to the point of collapse. The following advice will help any business, large or small, to protect itself from crime.

 Accessing your premises
• Only give master keys to trusted members of staff.  Check regularly that no keys have been lost – if they are, immediately change the locks.
• Appoint trusted, nominated key holders or a security company to attend out of hours if there is an emergency.
• Never leave keys lying around.
• For high security areas, use push button combination locks and change the codes regularly. Make sure staff are careful not to let passers by see the code as they enter it.

CCTV
To ensure your CCTV is fully effective:
• Clean the lens regularly.
• Store the equipment in a locked cabinet.
• Save a recorded tape or digital image for 31 days before recording over it.
• Ensure that time and date settings are correct.
• Face a camera towards the doorway so you get clear head and shoulders images.
• To be legal you must have clear signage stating: the name of the operator, the purpose of the CCTV (i.e. crime prevention), contact phone number. Visit www.ico.gov.uk for more details.

 Alarms
• Monitored alarm systems with police response are strongly recommended. Get quotations from at least three companies who are subject to independent inspection by an approved body. These include: National Security Inspectorate (NSI), Security Systems and Alarms Inspection Board (SSAIB).
• To get a police response to your alarm system, you must use a company that is registered with the NSI or SSAIB.
• Alarm systems should comply with the latest British and European standards.

 Security lighting
• Make sure your security lights are positioned properly.
• Check lights regularly to make sure they are working.
• Permanent low-cost dusk to dawn lighting is preferable to higher cost lighting linked to a movement sensor.
• Make sure lighting does not affect CCTV.
• Leave some lights on or use a timer to give the impression that someone is there 24/7.
• Keep as little cash as possible on the premises, move excess cash to a safe place and do not count it in view of anyone.
• Site tills away from entrance/exit doors.
• If possible, avoid paying staff in cash.
• Leave tills empty and open at night.

 Preventing theft
• Where possible keep doors and windows shut and locked.
• Lock valuable items such as tools away when not in use.
• Avoid predictable routines such as moving cash at the same time each day.
• Never leave reception desks unattended.
• Search your premises before leaving.
• Stock take regularly.
• Provide lockers for staff if possible.
• Consider installing a UV dye spray system at entry points, use UV grease on valuable outdoor materials, and a permanent property marking system on expensive equipment – along with signage warning of their presence.
• Encourage staff to report anything suspicious and make sure they know what to do if there is a robbery.
• For more advice contact your local crime reduction advisor by calling 101.

Useful links: 

British Chambers of Commerce: www.britishchambers.org.uk

Designing Out Crime: www.designcouncil.org.uk

Secured By Design: www.securedbydesign.com

———————————————-

PREVENTING TERRORISM

While Surrey is a low risk county for terrorist activity, we still need to be alert to tensions and extremist groups in our communities. If you see something suspicious or if you’re unsure about a person’s behaviour or activities, your information could be vital. Call the Anti-terrorism hotline on 0800 789 321 to report your concerns in the strictest confidence. No call is a waste of time. If you suspect it, report it.

 If it’s an emergency, dial 999.

Surrey Police has specially trained Counter Terrorism Security Advisers (CTSAs) who can provide advice to businesses that could be at risk from terrorist activity, particularly those in crowded places.

If you feel that your company could benefit from Counter Terrorism Security Advice, which is provided free of charge, your local CTSA can be contacted by emailing ctsa@surrey.pnn.police.uk or calling 01483 639871.

Surrey Police works in line with the Government’s Prevent strategy which aims to:
• Challenge the ideology that supports terrorism and those who promote it.
• Protect vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorist-related activity.
• Support sectors and institutions where there are risks of radicalisation.

The Prevent Strategy can be read in full on the Gov.uk website.

Surrey Police has a team of Prevent Engagement Officers (PEO’s) who work with the public and partner agencies to prevent terrorism and violent extremism from taking root in our communities. These officers aim to safeguard individuals and institutions from all forms of terrorist ideology and work closely with partner agencies such as local authorities, schools, Universities and health institutions, to ensure communities in Surrey are well placed to report and respond to terrorist related concerns.

If you have concerns linked to terrorism or violent extremism or you would like to find out more around the strategy please contact the Prevent team at Surrey Police on 101.

Terrorist related concerns can be reported via the Gov.uk website or by calling the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE ANY OTHER TOPICS INCLUDED IN MONTHLY NEWSLETTER? PLEASE LET ME KNOW.

I WELCOME ANY FEEDBACK.

 

Andrew Kim
Police Constable 3729
Safer Neighbourhood Team
Elmbridge Borough
SURREY POLICE
SPIRE: 31673
DIRECT: 01784 631673
OWE: 15-8925
www.surrey.police.uk

 

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Weybridge Police Team – HQ Statement

 

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From: Andrew Kim (PC 3729)
Safer Neighbourhood Team
Elmbridge Borough
SURREY POLICE

Dear All,

You may have seen the official statement made by Chief Constable Owens yesterday. Surrey Police is going through a major reorganisation for its core operation.

Please see the statement made by Surrey Police:
New focus for policing in Surrey

A significant increase in issues and crimes affecting vulnerable people, accompanied by austerity-driven budget cuts means the current local policing model in Surrey needs to change.

Crime is changing
Over the last three years we have seen a 153% increase in reports of rape, a 122% increase in reports of sexual offences and a 34% increase in reports of domestic violence. In the same time period reports of house burglaries have fallen by 24% and reports of theft from cars is down 32%.

We now have five hospitals in our ten top locations for repeated calls for help. This illustrates the dramatic and on going change in typical call outs.

Public safety and welfare issues currently make up 27% of all the incidents we deal with and 50-60% of crimes involve a vulnerable victim, witness or offender.

Set against the context that Surrey remains one of the safest counties in the country, we need the public to understand how the crime that does occur is changing. We are responding to all of these crimes and will continue to do so. We are also solving more crimes affecting vulnerable people, however reports to us continue to increase.

To meet this changing picture we are responding by increasing the size of our teams that protect the vulnerable by 34%. Earlier this year we also created a joint Cyber Crime Unit with Sussex Police.

Easy to access services and continuity of care
We know how much the public in Surrey values visible local policing and how you want policing to be responsive to your needs. Therefore, whether you want the convenience of just contacting us online, giving us a call or if you come to talk to us at one of our police front counters, we will try to resolve your inquiry straight away if we can. When we need to send an officer in most cases they will now be able to deal with your case from start to finish so you will get a better service and a better investigation.

Out in your neighbourhoods
You will see us more – technology means we do not need to go back to base to find out information and fill out forms.

Your local policing team will be bigger as we will have more officers working for a specific Borough or District, tackling local problems and supporting smaller but still dedicated Safer Neighbourhood Teams.

You will continue to have a dedicated local Inspector and dedicated Safer Neighbourhood Team Police Community Support Officers who will work with partners such as hospitals and councils to make communities safer.

They will be focused on solving the chronic local issues that cause the greatest risk and harm to local communities.

Focusing on prevention and using your money better
We have to save a further £25 million over the next four years and we do not feel it is fair that the Surrey public pays for police to respond to and investigate crimes that big businesses could prevent. We will be working with businesses that could do more to stop crime occurring to encourage them to install solutions, such as pre-pay at petrol stations.

We also need the Surrey public to help us keep themselves safe by taking their own sensible crime prevention measures, whether that is protecting your computer from online crime, making sure you know who your children are talking to on the web and in person or just being neighbourly by helping those who might be vulnerable to stay safe.

We will be running a campaign in the New Year to help the public know who will be the most suitable organisation to deal with their concern or issue. Last year we dealt with 10,270 requests that could have been dealt with in a different way or by a more appropriate agency.

 Delivering all our services differently
Local policing is just one small part of how we keep the public safe. Increasingly we are looking at how we work with local, regional and national partnerships and collaboration to deliver services in a better, more cost effective way.

We have successful Joint Enforcement Teams made up of council officers and police officers tackling anti-social behaviour together in Reigate and Banstead and Spelthorne, and are about to roll out in Elmbridge on 4 December 2015.

We run some services jointly with Sussex Police – both non-operational services such as HR, finance and IT and some joint specialist policing services such as firearms and major crime investigation.

We are also working with other emergency services and local authority partners across Surrey and Sussex – to provide a more joined up service to the public and make better use of shared skills and resources that we all have. For example working with Surrey Fire and Rescue and using their specialist heat sensing equipment to help us search for missing people.

We have well established regional police units for the South East who investigate organised crime and terrorism and a national police helicopter service. We are currently exploring other specialist services both regionally and nationally that could be delivered such as joined up systems through the National Police IT Company.

These plans will enable Surrey Police to better protect the public by responding to these changing patterns of crime and at the same time delivering the necessary savings. We will also keep neighbourhood policing visible, accessible and focused on solving the problems that blight local communities.

We will achieve these changes by adjusting how we respond, using technology to make us more efficient and moving existing officers and staff into priority areas, whilst also having to reduce local policing by a total of 234 staff posts and 32 officer posts.

Chief Constable Lynne Owens said: “Crime is changing and this is our response to it. We are re-focusing our services to protect the vulnerable and tackle the changing risks, threats and harm our communities face.

“Our plans still ensure that much valued visible local policing is at the heart of the Surrey Police model. Additionally we are equipping officers with technology so they do not need to waste time by going back to base. With the changing nature of crime and the requirement to save a further £25 million over the next four years this fundamental re-balancing of our policing service has been necessary.”

Police and Crime Commissioner Kevin Hurley said: “It has been impossible to escape the news stories highlighting desperate attempts by police forces and Police and Crime Commissioners to mitigate the effects of government funding cuts. I would like to thank Surrey Police for their concerted efforts to make sensible and thoughtful savings in this restructuring plan that is ‘Policing in Your Neighbourhood’.”

Surrey Advertiser has a useful article on its website:
http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/surrey-police-job-cuts-focus-10436742

Regards,

Andrew Kim
Police Constable 3729
Safer Neighbourhood Team
Elmbridge Borough
SURREY POLICE
SPIRE: 31673
DIRECT: 01784 631673
OWE: 15-8925
www.surrey.police.uk

Weybridge Police Team Newsletter – October 2015

 

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From:  Andrew Kim (PC 3729)
Safer Neighbourhood Team
Elmbridge Borough
SURREY POLICE

 Crime Stats of October 2015.

General Crime is DOWN but burglary and Fraud is UP. Please use security lights and use house alarm if you have it installed.

  • Residential Burglary
    • Brooklands Road near shell petrol station – Forced entry through the window between 0700 – 1700 – Jewellary and electrical items taken
    • Oatlands Chase – Forced entry through the rear french door between 0900 – 1900 – Jewellary and electrical items taken
    • Bridgewater Road – Forced entry through the side window between 0800 – 1800 – Jewellary taken
    • Monument Green – Entry gained through the front door (unknown if locked) at 1430 – suspect ran away
    • Oatlands Drive – Vurnerable communal area targetted overnight – 3 high value racing bicycles taken
  • Fraud
    • Attempt Op Edisto – suspects have called victim purporting to be Police Officers and attempted to get the victim to withdraw £5000 and exchange it to euros.
    • have paid money to male who remotely accessed computer to improve the internet connection
    • Have attempted to obtain some personal details via deception from an elderly female using fake ID

PLEASE LOOK AFTER YOUR VURNERABLE NEIGHBOURS.

VISIT http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ FOR MORE ADVICE.  IF YOU WISH TO DISCUSS THIS MATTER WITH US, PLEASE LET ME KNOW

DO YOU NEED CRIME PREVENTION ADVICE? Please email us on elmbridge@surrey.pnn.police.uk

Burglary: reduce the risk

Darker evenings mean more residential burglaries. To counteract this Surrey Police is running a three week campaign focusing on burglary.
Burglary has significantly reduced locally, helped by Surrey residents protecting themselves by securing their properties, ensuring doors are locked, and lights are left on. However, even with this decrease, we still want Surrey to be a no go area for potential burglars.

Love your stuff? Register it!

Registering your belongings free with Immobilise improves your chances of getting it back if it is lost or stolen, and can also help us in tracking and catching those responsible if you are burgled. Get started now and create a FREE private and secure list of all your personal property.

Is it nothing? Or is it the information we need to catch a burglar?

By working closely with the public to gain information about suspicious activity, we can increase the intelligence we use to actively hunt and catch burglars.  Suspicious activity could be:

  • Jumping over walls or fences
  • Hanging around a house
  • Suspicious selling of goods
  • Peering through windows or doors
  • Running from a scene

We would rather investigate a suspected burglary than be called when it’s too late, so if you see something suspicious in action in your street, dial 999 and let us know.
If you think you may have any other information that could help us, dial 101, report online or call the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Halloween 2015

Surrey Police will again be working with its partners to tackle anti-social behaviour during the Halloween period. There will be additional patrols throughout Surrey to ensure that last year’s drop in anti-social behaviour over Halloween is maintained.

Trouble is increasingly rare, but Surrey Police wants to make it clear to potential trouble makers that criminal offences will not be tolerated.

You can download a ‘no trick or treaters’ or a ‘trick or treaters welcome’ poster for display in your window (see below) they are also available from your local Safer Neighbourhood team.

If you or your children are planning to go out trick or treating, please keep in mind the following safety advice:

  • Always go with an adult or group of responsible friends and tell your parents where you are going
  • Never knock on a stranger’s door or go into a house
  • Respect the wishes of those people displaying a ‘no trick or treat’ sign
  • Stay in areas that are well lit and don’t go off on your own
  • Be visible especially if you are going near areas with busy roads
    • Do not vandalise property or throw items like egg or flour – this causes a lot of damage and upset and could be classed as a criminal offence
    • Remember your actions might frighten vulnerable people, particularly the elderly or those who live alone, so be considerate
    • If there is a problem or incident outside your house call Surrey Police on 101. In an emergency always dial 999.

Have a safe and enjoyable Bonfire Night

Please be reassured that Surrey Police will again be working with its partners on Bonfire Night to ensure that last year’s drop in anti-social behaviour is maintained. There will be additional patrols throughout Surrey to make it clear to potential trouble makers that criminal offences will not be tolerated.

Follow this advice to stay safe on Bonfire Night:

  • Keep fireworks in a closed box
  • Follow the instructions on each firework
  • Light at arm’s length using a taper
  • Stand well back
  • Once a firework has been lit NEVER go back even if it hasn’t gone off it could still explode
  • Never put fireworks in your pocket or throw them
  • Light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves
  • Do not give sparklers to the under 5s
  • Keep pets indoors

Remember it is illegal to: 

  • Set off or throw fireworks in public – you face a fine of up to £5,000 and can be imprisoned for up to six months 
  • Possess fireworks in public if aged under 18 Set off fireworks after 11pm in the evening or midnight on November 5 

Thank you for your continued support.

Constable Andrew Kim 3729
Elmbridge Safer Neighbourhood Team
Weybridge
SURREY POLICE
OWE 07967 988925 (15-8925)
SPIRE: 31673
www.surrey.police.uk

 

Postscript

DO YOU HAVE ANY LARGE PUBLIC EVENT PLANNED FOR THIS WINTER?   DO YOU WISH TO DISCUSS WITH YOUR LOCAL TEAM?  PLEASE LET US KNOW BY EMAILING: elmbridge@surrey.pnn.police.uk

 If you wish to contact a specific officer, please email:

PC 3729 KIM – andrew.kim@surrey.pnn.police.uk
PC 40462 EARLY – james.early@surrey.pnn.police.uk
PCSO 13227 CHRISTIE – angela.christie@surrey.pnn.police.uk
PCSO 14523 JANES – sarah.janes@surrey.pnn.police.uk

To contact Surrey Police or to report a crime or incident please telephone the Surrey Police non-emergency number on 101.

For non-urgent notification of a minor crime you can also use the online crime reporting facility available at www.surrey.police.uk

For local news, dates of local surgeries or your next Police-Public panel meeting please visit
http://www.surrey.police.uk/my-neighbourhood

IN EMERGENCY ALWAYS DIAL 999

 

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands – Nov 2015 to Jan 2016

 

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Forthcoming Events at Brooklands


Below are events taking place at Brooklands Museum during the next three months. Further details can be best found at the Brooklands Trust Members (BTM) website. See www.brooklandsmembers.co.uk/events and choose BTM, Talk or Museum events or phone 01932 857381.

 NOVEMBER 2015

 11th                  Torchlight Tour (bowl of soup and roll included).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton by email: events@brooklandsmuseum.com> or call on Ext 253.

15TH                 Military Vehicles Day.  Action on Mercedes Benz 4×4 course and the Test Hill.

19th                  BTM Talk:  “First World War Fighter Pilot” with Vernon Creek from RAF Museum Hendon

 DECEMBER 2015

5th -6th             Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton on ext 253 or email:  <events@brooklandsmuseum.com>

7th                    BTM Talk: Broadcaster, TT and GP rider, world champion truck racer Steve Parrish – an evening of irreverent facts and humour.   Tickets onsale via the BTM website or the BTM Office.  Start 7.30pm, light meals and bar from 6pm.  Members £8, non-members £10.

12th                  Concorde Champagne Day.  For details contact  ext 237 or email: flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com

13th                  BTM  Christmas Lunch

  12th -13th     Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years).  See 5th to 6th December for details.

16th                  Torchlight Tour (bowl of soup and roll included).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton by email: events@brooklandsmuseum.com> or call on ext 253.

19th -20th       Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years).  See 5th to 6th December for details.

JANUARY 2016

 1st                    New Year’s Day Gathering.  Pre-1986 classics, supercars and interesting vehicles on-site

19th                  BTM Talk:  “The Greenwood Family and Brooklands” by Alan Greenwood.  Start 7.30pm in the Napier Room. Advance tickets from 07880-670379 or email: talks@brooklandsmembers.co.uk

30th                  Vintage Motoring Film Evening and Supper.  Booking via Ann Watson ext 243 or annwatson@brooklandsmuseum.com

 31th                  VSCC Driving Tests.  Test Hill in action and auto tests.                   

 

 

Update from Surrey Police – September 2015

 

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Update from Surrey Police Chief Constable Lynne Owens 
Issue 39: September 2015

I want to dedicate most of this month’s bulletin to sharing with you how the nature of policing is changing and what that means for us here in Surrey.

To give you some context, we currently receive around 1,500 requests for service every day and to fully understand what this is made up of the Force has undertaken an in-depth six month analysis.

The results will be used to help us develop a sustainable and scalable local policing model that better enables us to focus on the right priorities and demands and has the flexibility to respond to new opportunities, threats and risks as they emerge. This is about making sure can make the right decisions in the best interests of the public for now and into the future.

There have been some interesting findings from the analysis and I think it is important to share some of these with you to really highlight what the policing picture in Surrey currently looks like.

What is changing?

We know the nature of reported crime and offending patterns are changing. More is happening behind closed doors and online which means we are seeing increases in reports of crimes like domestic abuse, child sexual exploitation, sexual offences and cybercrime, and a reduction in traditional volume crimes such as burglary and car crime.

hese are crimes which are more complex to investigate and often involve physical harm to the victims. It is imperative that our response can support this increase in vulnerable victims and bring their offenders to justice.

At the same time, funding for public services continues to reduce.

We already face significant financial challenges, with further cuts to the police budget likely for the next five years. We are currently awaiting the unveiling of the government’s spending review in November with bated breath.

We want to make the best choices we can so the public get the right services from us as we face even less funding and changing and growing demands on us. To get to the heart of this we have been examining the services we can and should provide so that we can be clear about what will have to change. We are calling this the Policing in Your Neighbourhood (PIYN) project.

So what has been keeping us busy?

 Many would assume that town centres would feature in the top five locations that the police are routinely called to. In Surrey this has proven not to be the case as the top five locations are all hospitals. We need to continue our work with health care providers to understand how we can prevent and reduce this in the future. Of course we should and always will attend those situations where a police response is required, such as if a member of staff is assaulted, but often the calls are not of that nature.

 Our next busiest places for police attendance were Woking, Camberley and Guildford town centres, the A3 – in particular around Wisley services north and south – and Sunbury Cross shopping centre.

 Our two busiest times of the day are around 4pm and 11pm when we see the biggest spike in calls. For the latter, callers sometimes don’t have anywhere else to go for non-police concerns out of hours and this will need to change.

 We know that both the police Safeguarding Investigation Units and Surrey County Council’s Social Services are increasingly stretched – in the last year alone 1,000 strategy meetings were held.

 We have a Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub which sees officers working closely with social workers and other partners to respond to concerns around young people and vulnerable adults. Last year it received over 20,000 referrals that required risk assessing. Any concerns for safety lead to a co-ordinated response which puts a stretch on all of us involved but is important as it’s often focused on the most vulnerable.

 Calls to deal with missing people are rising – last year we responded to almost 3,000 more than the previous year. We need to work with partners such as hospitals and children’s homes to see if more can be done to reduce this in the interests of the individuals needing help and the impact on our services.

 Nearly half of those detained in custody in the last year had mental health or wellbeing issues. Work is already underway with partner organisations to ensure the right agency responds in these instances and people can access the most appropriate service.

In a world where police funding is reducing, it is critical we get this right. Without the required cross service reform it will be the public, most notably the more vulnerable members of our society, who will otherwise suffer as a consequence.

We will be holding a series of events online and via our social media channels in the coming months to have conversations with the public about these issues.

Many of you are partners who are also affected by these changing pressures and are likely to want to understand more about what we have found and how together we can reduce them. Therefore, Assistant Chief Constable Gavin Stevens will be sharing more detail with those of you most affected shortly. There will be the opportunity to come to Mount Browne for some partnership events where you can find out more and we can develop some coordinated solutions.

Reform of police funding arrangements in England and Wales

You may be aware that policing in Surrey receives a very small central government grant compared to other forces. The Home Office has recognised that the current funding formula needs to be reviewed and has been carrying out a consultation with Police and Crime Commissioners and Chief Constables across England and Wales to get feedback on a new police funding model.

We have provided a joint response with the Police and Crime Commissioner’s Office to the consultation and we are now waiting for the Home Office proposals to be finalised on the back of the 1,700 responses they received to the consultation before there are further opportunities to comment on it.

Operational successes

Here is just a flavour of some of our policing activity this month – ranging from burglary and drink-driving to sexual offences and anti-social behaviour – all of it helping to keep the Surrey public safe.

 A delivery driver from Mytchett has been sentenced to five and a half years in prison for more than 20 serious sexual offences against children. He was also given a Sexual Harm Prevention Order and will remain on the Sex Offenders Register until further notice. This was a long and complex investigation which found that he had created five accounts on Twitter from which to access and upload indecent images of children which were distributed via the social media channel.

 A man found guilty of the murder of his younger brother in Farncombe earlier this year has been sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum tariff of 12-years.

 The power of social media was demonstrated earlier this month when the life of a highly vulnerable missing woman was saved as a direct result of a member of the public seeing our appeal on Facebook and reporting her sighting to us so we were able to find her.

 A drink-driver from Woking has been banned for three years after being caught over the limit – coincidentally by the same two Roads Policing officers – twice in two weeks. He was initially stopped on the A3, charged with drink-driving and released on bail. However while on bail he was stopped again when his vehicle was found to have an expired MOT certificate and found to be over the drink-drive limit again.

 A 25-year-old man has been given a Criminal Behaviour Order (CBO), banning him from the Spelthorne area for three years. He has also been banned from acting in a threatening or aggressive manner, inciting others to act in a threatening manner, or cause alarm or distress towards any person within Surrey. The series of offences which led to the CBO being issued included assault, theft, criminal damage, burglary, robbery, drugs offences and public order offences. Tackling his drug dealing activity also led to a crack house closure in Cadbury Road, Sunbury last year.

 Surrey Police has used new powers to obtain its first Interim Anti-Social Behaviour Injunction against a 29 year old woman to put a stop to the nuisance and distress she caused to the residents of Runnymede until a trial date is set.

 A man has been arrested on suspicion of distraction-style burglaries in which vulnerable adults in the Woking and West Molesey areas were targeted.

 A 23 year old man from Basingstoke who was responsible for the theft of large numbers of DVDs and video games has been sentenced to seven months’ imprisonment after pleading guilty to a string of thefts from shops across the county.

 We have arrested two men following an armed robbery at a Co-Operative store in Smallfield on 26 September. Three members of staff were working in the store at the time and were left extremely shaken after being threatened.

Key diary dates

Anti-Social Behaviour Awareness Week: This partnership campaign running during w/c 28 September aims to ensure residents know which organisation deals with each type of ASB and what can be done to tackle it, enabling local problems to be solved earlier and hopefully resulting in a better service to the public.

Epsom & Ewell Crime Summit: 6.30 – 9pm, 12 October, Longmead Centre, Espom

Reigate & Banstead Crime Summit: 6.30 – 9pm, 22 October, Harlequin Theatre, Redhill

Tandridge Crime Summit: 6.30 – 9pm, 3 November, District Council Offices, Oxted

For details of Neighbourhood Panel meetings, Police Surgeries and ‘Meet the Beat’ sessions in your neighbourhood, visit our website: www.surrey.police.uk

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands – Oct to Dec 2015

 

four classics

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands

Below are events taking place at Brooklands Museum during the next three months. Further details can be best found at the Brooklands Trust Members (BTM) website. See www.brooklandsmembers.co.uk/events and choose BTM, Talk or Museum events or phone 01932 857381.

OCTOBER 2015

4th                    Morgan Day.  Test Hill in action and cavalcade on the Mercedes Benz World circuit.

10th                  Concorde Champagne Day.  For details contact  ext 237 or email: flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com  (NB waiting list)

11th                  Autumn Motorsport Day.  Action on Mercedes Benz circuit and Test Hill.

18th                  London Bus Museum:  TransportFest

25th                  Autumn Classic Breakfast.  Action on Test Hill.  Gates open at 7.45am

26th – 30th           Half-Term family activities including Car Rides

29th                  BTM Talk:  “Apollo 13 A Successful Failure” with Phil Holt.  Start 7.30pm in the Napier Room. Advance tickets from 07880-670379 or email: talks@brooklandsmembers.co.uk

30th                  Hallowe’en Torchlight Tour, (2 course meal included): Pre-booking only, email Donna Hopton at: events@brooklandsmuseum.com or call Ext 253.

NOVEMBER 2015

11th                  Torchlight Tour (bowl of soup and roll included).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton by email: events@brooklandsmuseum.com> or call on Ext 253.

15th                Military Vehicles Day.  Action on Mercedes Benz 4×4 course and the Test Hill.

19th                  BTM Talk:  “First Wprld War Fighter Pilot” with Vernon Creek from RAF Museum Hendon

DECEMBER 2015

5th -6th             Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton on ext 253 or email:  <events@brooklandsmuseum.com>

7th                    BTM Talk: Broadcaster, TT and GP rider, world champion truck racer Steve Parrish – an evening of irreverent facts and humour. Tickets onsale via the BTM website or the BTM Office.  Start 7.30pm, light meals and bar from 6pm.  Members £8, non-members £10.

12th                  Concorde Champagne Day.  For details contact  ext 237 or email: flyconcorde@brooklandsmuseum.com

13th                  ‘BTM Christmas Lunch  .

12th -13th           Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years.  See 5th to 6th December for details.

16th                  Torchlight Tour (bowl of soup and roll included).  Pre-booking only, contact Donna Hopton by email: events@brooklandsmuseum.com> or call on ext 253.

19th -20th            Santa on the Sultan of Oman’s VC10 (for children up to 8 years.  See 5th to 6th December for details.                     

These listings are kindly provided by BrooklandsMuseum

 

Rugby World Cup 2015

 

Rugby scrum NZ

Rugby World Cup 2015

The Rugby World Cup is coming.  It starts on the 18th September with the opening match at Twickenham.

The Cobham Rugby Club is confirmed as the official training base for the Italy and Namibia Teams during September.  The actual World Cup Trophy is currently ‘on tour’ around the country and was on view last Saturday, 29th August at the Club’s Old Surbitonians Memorial Ground in Fairmile Lane, allowing members and local residents a chance to see the iconic Webb Ellis Trophy just twenty days before Rugby World Cup 2015 commences.

The day included a Rugby match with Cobham’s Under 21’s taking on Farnham’s Under 21’s.

Visit the Cobham Rugby Club website at: www.cobhamrfc.com/RWC2015atCobhamRugby  to see more details of the RWC2015 events, including the schedule of games live on the Club’s big screen.

 

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands – Sept to Nov 2015

 

four classics

Forthcoming Events at Brooklands

Below are events taking place at Brooklands Museum during the next three months. Further details can be best found at the Brooklands Trust Members (BTM) website. See www.brooklandsmembers.co.uk/events and choose BTM, Talk or Museum events or phone 01932 857381.

SEPTEMBER 2015

6th                   Classic American Day.  Paddock display, celebrating 60th anniversary of the 1955 Chevy.

16th-21st          BTM Event: Rally to Circuit des Remparts,  Angouleme, France.  For details contact Angela Hume on 07884-184882 or email:  <angelahume@brooklandsmembers.co.uk>

17th                  BTM Talk: ‘Fast Women in Motor Sport 1888 -1970’ by Sarah Croft from the National Motor Museum.

20th                  Aviation Day. Air display, children’s activities.  Bomber Command veterans’ book and memorabilia signing.

26th                  ‘Mach 2 for Tea’. Champagne on Concorde and afternoon tea in the Vickers Suite hosted by Capt Mike Bannister. For details call the Museum at ext 237 on 01932-857381.

27th                  Brooklands Great War 100 commemoration.

 OCTOBER 2015

 4th                    Morgan Day.  Test Hill in action and cavalcade on the Mercedes Benz World circuit.

11th                  Autumn Motorsport Day.  Action on Mercedes Benz circuit and Test Hill.

18th                  London Bus Museum:  TransportFest

25th                  Autumn Classic Breakfast.  Action on Test Hill

29th                  BTM Talk:  “Apollo 13 A Successful Failure” with Phil Holt

NOVEMBER 2015

15TH                 Military Vehicles Day.  Action on Mercedes Benz 4×4 course and  the Test Hill.

19th                  BTM Talk:  “First Wprld War Fighter Pilot” with Vernon Creek from RAF Museum Hendon                     

These listings are kindly provided by BrooklandsMuseum

Update from Surrey Police – August 2015

 

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Update from Surrey Police Chief Constable Lynne Owens
Issue 38: August 2015

This month’s bulletin starts on a positive note, as I am pleased to tell you about some areas where our service to the public has improved.

Our determined focus on burglary means that the chance of becoming a victim in this county continues to fall (following the trend of the last few years). Burglaries have reduced by 21% in the financial year to date compared to the same period last year. In recent weeks, a focus on investigating serious sexual offences has led to a significant rise in the number of these terrible crimes where the offender is charged or cautioned. We are still striving to improve further in this area, but this is good news as by getting more offenders convicted we are bringing justice to their victims as well as preventing others from becoming victims in the future.

Similarly, we have responded to your feedback about our call answering performance for 101 non-emergency calls, as you will be aware that we have had significant challenges over the last year. This has also improved, albeit we think there is more to do. One of the challenges we have is that a certain volume of calls we get are not about policing issues. For example, we are still picking up a lot of calls to 101 – especially out of normal office hours – about responsibilities that are the primary responsibility of partners. This is something which collectively we need to help the public understand so they get the service they need from the right people.

In the news

There rarely seems a time when policing is not under the media microscope and many of you will have no doubt seen national headlines over the past few weeks concerning the approach other forces are taking in dealing with local policing, burglary and drugs.

As an organisation we have made significant savings and the Government is currently consulting on a further reduction (of between 25-35%) for the September spending review. The reality is that an organisation which is more than 50% smaller will have to do things differently and, in some instances, less in the future.

So it is with interest that I have been reading the national coverage of different Forces’ stances on growing cannabis, the trial of taking forensics for attempted break-ins only at even-numbered houses and the prospect that police officers may no longer attend burglaries.

You may have read that Surrey is one of a number of forces reported to be ‘going soft’ on cannabis. The truth is our policy has not changed in this area.

We have always encouraged officers to use discretion when dealing with cannabis. You would expect us to prioritise a known criminal caught with cannabis, or an organised crime group linked to people trafficking and modern slavery setting up large scale factories in our communities, above a teenager caught smoking the class C drug. The former would require determined prosecution and the latter probably education and advice.

Only last month officers executed a warrant at a rented property in Camberley following information received from members of the public and discovered a large scale cannabis factory which had been dismantled.

In the same way nothing has changed with regards to our aim of reducing and detecting burglary offences. From a Surrey perspective, domestic burglary has long been a priority area and the Force has made significant strides in reducing the number of offences (as I have highlighted above). The improved number of convictions last year has led to reduced levels of burglary being reported so far in 2015, and this work will continue to further protect our residents.

Policing is currently focused on being more efficient with the tightening resources we have and we are taking a long hard look at what we have traditionally dealt with and what we need to do differently to meet the challenge of changing crime patterns.

We need to ask ourselves how we can make our processes and systems less complicated and therefore cheaper. We need to find tangible examples of where operational practice could change and these may not always be popular.

Policing is important and we know remains much valued by the public. The challenge for police leaders is how to secure informed, honest and serious public debate without the hysteria.

Over the next month or two we hope to use this bulletin (among other routes) to have those conversations with you – our key stakeholders – and the wider public.

Partnership scheme wins national award

I’m pleased to report that a youth intervention scheme, run jointly by the Force and Surrey County Council, has been recognised in the prestigious Restorative Justice category at the recent Howard League for Penal Reform’s National Community Awards.

Under the scheme, dedicated officers working closely with youth support service specialists are engaging with young people and victims to prevent re-offending. The key to the initiative’s success is the close partnership working that focuses on putting the needs and wishes of victims at the heart of the criminal justice system. We know the scheme is working well as the feedback from victims is overwhelmingly positive and levels of re-offending across the county have dropped dramatically since it was introduced.

Funding for cameras

Some more good news: the Force has been awarded £20,000 Community Infrastructure Levy funding by Elmbridge Borough Council to be used for installing extra Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras in the borough. The cameras will be invaluable in helping officers tackle criminals travelling in to the borough as they scan vehicle number plates against information we have on cars connected to criminality.

The neighbourhood team worked closely with the Surrey and Sussex Finance Team to apply for the funding and this is the first successful application using Community Infrastructure Levy in Surrey and Sussex. Officers are working with a number of local authorities to consider further bids.

Operational successes

When crime does happen we are there catching those responsible and making sure they are brought to justice. While the bulletin can never give you the true scale of where we have been making an impact, I hope it gives you a snapshot of what we are up to and the hard work of my offices and staff:

 A chain of London drug dealers has been dismantled thanks to the close working relationship between the Force’s Serious and Organised Crime Unit and the National Crime Agency. Six men have been sentenced to a total of over 40 years following the discovery of around 33kg of cocaine with a potential street value of £6.3 million. Officers from both Surrey Police and the NCA stopped three vehicles, each containing drugs, after they were seen leaving a property on Croydon Road in Caterham. The following day six men were charged with possession of a class A drug with intent to supply.

 A complex joint investigation between the Force and the Federation Against Copyright Theft has seen two fraudsters jailed for three and a half years for illegally selling on access to Premier League football coverage. The duo had obtained hundreds of domestic use only BSkyB cards which they then sold on to commercial premises, including pubs and betting shops. The fraud represented a loss of earnings to BSkyB of over half a million pounds. Further action against the pair will be taken under the Proceeds of Crime Act to confiscate anything they acquired as a result of the fraud.

 A 50-year-old man has been jailed for 12 years after admitting a string of non-recent sexual offences against two teenage boys in Surrey, south west London and Hertfordshire. He pleaded guilty to a total of 28 charges. He will also be on the Sex Offenders Register for life.

 A teenager, who pleaded guilty to causing grievous bodily harm with intent, has been jailed for nine years for a drugs-related knife attack in Guildford. Detectives trawled through hours of CCTV footage to piece together the offender’s movements, enabling them to successfully search for the knife, which had his DNA on it and had been used in the attack.

 Anti-social behaviour has been robustly tackled in conjunction with partners, resulting in a Closure Order and two Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBO) being handed out this month. The Closure was obtained on a property in Slyfield, Guildford after numerous reports of serious nuisance, including criminal and disorderly behaviour. A CBO was handed to a 22-year-old man, banning him from an area of Walton-on-Thames for two years, while a second Walton man was given a five year CBO after he made nuisance and abusive phone calls to our 999 operators and call handlers. He was also given a six week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months.

Key diary dates

For details of Neighbourhood Panel meetings, Police Surgeries and ‘Meet the Beat’ sessions in your neighbourhood, visit our website:  www.surrey.police.uk